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Lighting Industry To Stimulate Different Levels Of Exploration

Identified by the theme “THNKLIGHT: A new dimension”, the 2016 fair curated a matching event programme to promote the discussion and creation of big ideas. Over 100 seminar sessions came to life with expert speakers and attendees representing various facets of the lighting world. They engaged in dialogue concerning the various multitudes of lighting and shed light on the future of the industry.

Guest speaker and lighting designer for the City of Malmö in Sweden, Mr Johan Moritz, explained: “Everyone is talking about big data, smart cities, artificial intelligence and the IoT. Lighting is not only about energy efficiency anymore but more about delivering human-centric solutions and comfort to human beings.”

Mr Lear Hsieh, another seminar speaker and President of the Chinese Lighting Designer Association, shares similar views. He adds: “Lighting in the future will be a combination of various technologies and it will automatically adjust according to human behaviours. Devices for lighting and ambiance will eventually be indistinguishable and we will only see the light, instead of the housings, that we ought to see.”

Moving forward, Mr Bryan Douglas, CEO and Secretary General at the Lighting Council Australia and Global Lighting Association, respectively, shares how companies can adapt to the changing landscape. He states: “In the future, companies must further consolidate and form partnerships with high-tech players to survive. They must embrace smart lighting, smart cities and connected lighting, and all luminaires must have the capabilities to have full connectivity.”

The fair’s multiscale efforts to stimulate exchange of new lighting concepts began in January 2016. In the lead up to the show, industry professionals submitted entries that revealed sustainability, digitalisation and individualisation are gaining ever-increasing importance in the lighting field. Moreover, experts agree that lighting is expanding beyond basic illumination and playing a more integral role in users’ daily lives. The fair demonstrated that lighting can improve moods, optimise work performance, heighten security and improve overall health.

From a design perspective, one show participant likened lighting to a delicate art – an art that requires creating balance between the atmosphere and functionality to create experiences by accentuating and reinterpreting architecture. Other specialists, who see lighting as a service, believe a properly designed and optimised lighting system can impact an organisation’s financial bottom line. They also shared that, over time, lighting will become more controllable and this will give way to emergence of more innovations.